Category Archives: Lincoln

2017 Lincoln MKZ (1176)

By Phil Shuyler

Look out for Lincoln. This longstanding nameplate (started in 1917) is working hard reimagining their brand, and their vehicles. The MKZ sedan has joined the fun and is updated for 2017.

The first thing you’ll notice is that this doesn’t look like a Lincoln – or what we think a Lincoln should look like. I received a lot of positive comments complementing the car’s styling, however then they’d say “…but it’s a Lincoln.” That’s the stigma Lincoln has to eliminate, or reduce, as they move forward. Buick is in the midst of a similar task. Both of these brands were, and primarily still are, seen as vehicles for older people. Both brands want to appeal to buyers under 65, so they’re doing all they can to reach and appeal to a younger audience.

So that’s a little on the status of Lincoln, now lets dive into the car! Inside, one of the first things you’ll notice is the sunroof that’s the definition of panoramic. It’s enormous, and is one giant piece of glass with no bars or gaps. We highly recommend choosing this impressive option. The waterfall look of the center stack is visually appealing and works well. The engine start/stop and buttons for the transmission are integrated into the waterfall, which takes some getting used to, but after a short time with the car, reaching for them becomes second nature.

The weather was quite cold during our test, and the heated front seats, rear seats and steering wheel were a must. The entire rim of the steering wheel is heated, which may seem simple, however other luxury vehicles only heat part of the wheel. When it’s 15 degrees, and you have a warm steering wheel, it’s nice to be able to move your hands and always enjoy the heat. Heated and cooled front seats are standard, and the heated rear seats and steering wheel are optional.

On the road, the massaging seats helped reduce fatigue and entertained and impressed each front seat passenger. The massage function is very noticeable and truly does make a difference. Another way to keep drivers engaged was through the use of the paddle shifters on the steering wheel. Not something many buyers in this segment will use, however they’re always fun to have.

As far as safety and semi-autonomous systems, the MKZ has adaptive cruise control (which we love) as well as a lane keep assist (LKA) system. We tested the LKA system on multiple occasions, and it was consistently inconsistent. We would engage the system, the lines would turn green, and once it reached the edge of the lane, the green line would turn yellow, and then the system would shut down. This could happen for multiple reasons like unrecognizable lines on the road, bad weather, or too sharp of a curve, however we would try to always test in ideal conditions. I think Lincoln has a little ways to go before they master LKA technology. And if you’d prefer to do all steering yourself, lane keep assist can be turned off, or just give you an audible alert when you depart from your lane without using a turn signal.

Additional safety features include blind spot monitors and rear cross traffic alert. There’s also a numeric keypad on the door that allows you to unlock the vehicle without a key. This is great if you ever need to leave the car for someone with the keys inside (which will not leave the car unlocked) or perhaps you want to go for a jog without your keys in your pocket. Just leave them in the car and use the keypad to get back in.

There’s a smartphone app available for the MKZ as well. With it, you’re able to remote start the car, lock or unlock it, and of course find it if you forgot where you parked.

The MKZ sports a 6-speed automatic transmission and a turbo inline 4-cylinder engine that delivers 240 horsepower and 270 lb-ft of torque. Hitting winding canyon roads, the adaptive headlights help increase visibility by illuminating around the upcoming curve. The intelligent all-wheel drive system kept us planted to the road, even when road conditions turned to compact snow and ice. During our 10 days with the car, we experienced 22 MPG city and over 30 MPG on the highway, which is right on par with Lincoln’s claim of 21 city and 31 highway.

Pricing for the 2017 Lincoln MKZ starts at $35,170 for the front wheel drive model and can reach around $50,000 for a fully loaded all-wheel drive model.

Make no mistakes about it, the MKZ is a vehicle you need to put on your shopping list. It’s comfortable, has tons of features, includes the latest technology, and has attractive styling. The main questions is, can you drive a Lincoln?

2010 Lincoln MKS (802)

Overview: 

This week we’re looking at the 2010 Lincoln MKS large sedan. Well I gotta tell you this was a neat car to drive. Like Batman you find yourself asking where do they get all these neat toys.

But when you use them you have to be amazed at the technology revolution. Everyone is designing something extraordinary and I’m reminded this is a Ford product and these guys are good, not just because they did it the old fashioned way – they earned it, but because they were responsible while other car companies needed a bail out. Ford had character and said NO. I’d like to think they said “Hell NO!”

I’m proud of you Ford guys. You’re making Henry proud.

The Lincoln Story

Lincoln has a long history of building luxury vehicles for the American marketplace. A division of the Ford Motor Co., Lincoln differentiates its vehicle lineup, which includes cars and SUVs, from their more pedestrian cousins with unique styling, luxurious interiors and more powerful engines. Henry Leland, the auto parts maker who founded Cadillac, produced the first Lincolns in 1920. Two years later, the company was purchased by Henry and Edsel Ford. In 1945 Lincoln-Mercury was established, and has been a staple in the American-made luxury segment ever since. According to the automaker, it has produced more than 7 million vehicles since 1920.

Handling & Performance:

This Lincoln combines Luxury with performance. Well, this is the first V-6 direct-injection twin-turbocharged engine produced in North America that is designed to deliver up to a 20 percent improvement in fuel economy without sacrificing performance. They say it is equivalent to a 4.6 liter normally aspirated V8 engine. I agree. And it does that with noticeably better fuel economy.

Styling:

This has got to be one of the best ever styles out of Lincoln. They have not always set themselves apart with Lincoln’s presence on the highway. But they are back with the newest lineup of product. I like it a lot.

Fit and Finish:

Very good.

Cost:

Hyundai, Chrysler, Toyota, Volvo and Lincoln came to play. They are the best of the rest as Greta says. Surely they are the most competitive and I’ve driven them all and this Lincoln is a top contender. . . and I’m not particularly a Ford guy.

Conveniences and comfort:

This is a big comfortable riding car and it isn’t surprising I found myself going much too fast at times. That’s where technology can help I slowed it down the “Smart Cruise” way. The radar sensing cruise control is better than ever. It is so transparent you begin to rely on it to do the watching you simply can’t do when driving . No one is perfect and you can take your eyes off the road for a split second and bam.

But the real show stopper is the automatic Parallel Parking feature. This is simply very very cool mostly because it works so very very well. And you can’t even use it on your driving test. Why? Because they don’t require you to parallel park to pass the test any longer. Say what?

Finally I also enjoy the simplicity of the “Hands Free” Cell phone blue tooth feature that is built in. It works flawlessly. And the “Capless” fuel filler is a simple thing but all I can say is thanks Ford. Nice.

Consumer Recommendation:

See Cost above and start there is price is a consideration.

Recognized Competition:

Lincoln MKS $41-48,000, Acura RL $47-54,000, Acura TL $35-43,000, Audi A6 $45-59,000, BMW 5 Series $46-61,000, Cadillac DTS $46-59,000, Cadillac STS $47-70,000, Chrysler 300 $27-45,000, Hyundai GenesisCoupe $22-32,000, Hyundai Genesis $33-40,000, Infiniti M $46-55,000, Jaguar XF Series $51-79,000, Lexus GS $46-54,000, Lexus GS 450h $57,450, Mercedes CLS Class $72-98,000, Mercedes-Benz E-Class $48-86,000, Toyota Avalon $28-35,000, Volvo S60 $33-36,000 Volvo S80 $39-51,000.

Good News:

Neat toys (features), well priced luxury in look and feel and comfort and good fuel economy for a large car.

Bad News:

Naturally you get a little paranoid when there is all this press about Toyota, Nissan and even some Ford products with electrical problems. You wonder when the hammer will fall on another automaker. Well, it didn’t happen on this Lincoln but there were a couple of times the Cruise cut out and displayed a message that it required “Driver Intervention”. In other words the computer didn’t like something and said you got it. Well it was simply an inconvenience and it kept running fine.

Standard Equipment:

3.5 liter ECO boost 355 hp V6 engine, 5-speed manual trans, electronic stability control, front & side airbags, post crash alert system, tire pressure monitor, remote keyless entry & anti-theft, LATCH child safety system, power windows, locks and mirrors, leather seating and leather wrapped tilt steering wheel, cruise control, power driver 6-way seat, manual 2-way front passenger seat, air conditioning, Shaker 500 audio system with in-dash 6-CD/MP3 player, SYNC voice activated system, auto headlights, fog lights, stainless steel dual exhaust, rear window defroster, rear deck lid spoiler, power cloth convertible top, easy fuel cap-less filler.

Gas Stats:

$2.97/ Gal avg. March 9 ‘10

www.fueleconomy.gov

for more information.

17 City and 25 Highway MPG

Pricing:

MSRP $47,760.

Your comments are welcomed. My e-mail is joe@atthewheel.com
Copyright © 2010 – An Automotive Love Affair

2007 Lincoln Navigator (636)

Overview:
This week we’re looking at the 2007 Lincoln Navigator. My first impression was the feeling of being “conspicuous” like I’m wearing a scarlet letter that singles me out as socially irresponsible. The second impression was – If Ford is in financial trouble you couldn’t tell it by the cars they are producing.

One indication of the irresponsibility may be true is that the vehicle description page proudly states under fuel economy “Not applicable to this unit”. I expect to see that omission on the Hummer or a Boeing 747 but … well, you know what I mean. And while I’m thinking about the 747 I felt compelled to tell passengers getting on board to stow their carry-on luggage in the overhead compartments.

You push buttons and things happen… eat your heart out Donald Trump! Open the doors and the running boards appear out of the seeming seamless folds of metal cladding. Approach the car from the rear with your groceries or whatever you have to load and with a click of your key fob the rear lid opens with waiting arms. Somehow you feel special as you command open Sesame…

General Info:

Parts – n/a

Assembly – USA

Class: – Special purpose.

Cars: – LS, Mark LT, MKX, MKZ, Navigator and Town Car.

Handling & Performance:

Like the 747 this baby has great momentum once you get it rolling but it feels a little sluggish off the line. Ok, I know, press the accelerator a little harder. But I was more interested in reaching the next gas station to replenish the quickly depleting fuel supply.

Unlike the Ford F150 which I had just finished testing, the steering felt very lose and uncertain.

Styling:

Beautiful. New bold presence of the grill and cladding that jumps out at you but not in a bad way. Chrome touches are well done and stand out like the bell of the ball. It’s hard to deny how good it feels to be showered with lavish and elegant appointments. But the Elite Package will set you back $5,450 for upgrades in appearance, entertainment center, power deploying running boards when the door is opened and navigation system. I have begun to be disappointed the test cars are not equipped with XM or Sirius satellite radios because they are worth the price of admission if only to eliminate commercial interruptions.

Fit and Finish:

Very good.

Cost:

Well, I don’t know about you but 50 grand is still a lot of money. And with the options you’ll be closer to $60,000.

Conveniences and comfort:

Lavishly appointed. But then my cell phone, albeit abundantly capable, is used for phone calls. Call me old fashioned but when you grow up using a dial phone it is enough that I can reach others or be reached on the phone residing on my hip – not my residence. In fact my home phone is really there only for faxing.

I rather like the power fold flat 3rd row seats. Nice touch. None of the pull here, push there to get the seat cushion moved so the seat back can fold down (kinda flat) – this does it each step of the way quickly and easily.

Colleague Peter said, “What! No Rear View Camera” in his thick Norwegian accent. I must say I was also surprised this luxury liner was not equipped with a way to see behind this boat. Interesting how people change when they have kids. But you’re right Peter; it’s nice to be able to avoid backing up over bikes, skate boards or little people who can’t defend themselves.

Things I would add would be a heads up display and distance sensing laser cruise control.

Consumer Recommendation:

If money is no object the luxury is nice and this will be your families SUV. But all that fluff is not necessary. Hell I don’t even have overstuffed leather seats in my home. Which reminds me that I should go out and buy one.

Recognized Competition:

Lincoln Navigator $46-52,000, Cadillac Escalade $55-59,000, Porsche Cayenne $42-112,000, GMC Yukon Denali $48-50,000, Chevrolet Suburban $37-49,000, Volvo XC90 $36-49,000, Land Rover Range Rover $77-92,000, Toyota Land Cruiser $56,000, Lexus LX 470 $67,000, Nissan Armada $35-43,000, Volkswagen Touareg $38-59,000, Infiniti QX56 $50-53,000.

Good News:

It’s nice to be pampered and this will do it, power when you need it, bun warmers are nice on those cold mornings and step in easily with running boards that deploy and retract automatically.

Bad News:

You’ll pay for the privilege in purchase price and cost to operate with low low fuel economy.

Standard Equipment:

5.4 liter 300 hp V8 engine, 6-speed auto trans, power moon roof and lift gate, power heated mirrors, integrated running boards, luggage roof rack, 6-in dash CD player, leather, 10 way power heated front seats, power 3rd row fold flat seats, climate control front and rear, 4-wheel ABS power disc brakes, power steering, reverse sensing system, power adjustable pedals, Class III trailer tow, remote keyless entry with keypad, front and side curtain air bags, traction control, anti theft system, tire pressure monitoring, lower anchors and tethers.

Options: entertainment package, power running boards, navigation, rear seat entertainment system and premium appearance package ($5,450).

Gas Stats:

$2.37/ Gal avg. Feb. 1, ‘07

www.fueleconomy.gov

for more information.

City and Highway MPG unstated

But I found it to be about 14 mpg overall.

Pricing:

MSRP $50,655.

2001 Lincoln LS 4-door (337)

Overview:
Ok folks, it’s time to buy American. This week’s version of Americana is from Ford that is as American as apple pie and Mount Rushmore. I wonder if the Brit’s see it quite that way since Ford now owns Jaguar on which the Lincoln LS shares its platform. In any case it was truly a pleasure to drive this car to the beautiful state of Oregon.

It was a great jaunt in part because of the nice ride we got from this out of character Lincoln. For sure it is a departure from what Lincoln typically puts on the road.

The LS is stylish and a great size for my taste. It’s still a 4-door and carries 4 people comfortably. Five people would be a stretch. We only had 4 people (two guys and two gals) but with too much luggage for a month, that week. Is it just me, or do all women pack for every possible contingency. Guys pack light and probable regret not having more. And you’d think if men were from Mars they’d pack better. The trunk was jammed but we really had way too much stuff.

Handling & Performance:

I like it. And with 5 on the floor it felt like a sport car with the added benefit of a big car ride. Contrary to some, I felt the V6 was very adequate but then I tested one with the manual trans so the performance was good in my opinion.

Styling:

Sporty and not Lincoln like in that regard. It’s almost like a fish out of water for the conservative division of Ford. Color can often make a difference and the LS I tested was a Pearl Blue color that added a touch of class.

Fit and Finish:

Outstanding. American cars have really come back a long way from the poor attention to quality we experienced from our spoiled American auto manufacturers. They owned the transportation market for too long and got sloppy. The past few decades however humbled them with a flood of hungry foreign automakers. You have to give credit where credit is due, and American carmakers have earned the respect in their fight for life against their tough foreign counterparts.

One area I am disappointed with most cars today is the phony wood trim. True it is getting hard to tell the difference but quality and luxury is often subtle. When you drive a car with a partial wood steering wheel, for example, the feel is unmistakable. Since you don’t handle the wood trim I guess it isn’t as noticeable that it is fake.

Conveniences:

Nicely appointed with all the trappings of luxury cars costing much more. You’ll have to pinch yourself to remember you’re in a Lincoln.

Cost:

A little high and I think they need to trim about 10% off the top. Think of that when you approach the dealer to buy one.

Recommendation:

If you’re looking for a mid sized car with class plus, luxury, economical to operate and will second as a commuter this is a must drive, amongst the tough competition listed below.

The Competition:

Acura TL $28,880-33,230, Audi A6 $34,300-49,400, BMW 3 Series $26,990-42,400, Cadillac Catera $31,305, Chrysler 300M $29,640, Infiniti I30 $29,465-31,540, Jaguar S-Type $43,655-49,355, Lexus IS 300 $30,805, Mazda Millenia $28,025-31,025, Mercedes Benz C-Class $29,950-36,950, Oldsmobile Aurora $30,619-34,794, Saab 9-5 $33,995-40,175, Volvo S70 $27,500-33,600.

Good News:

It’s American, comfortable, economical, luxurious, sporty, handles well.

Bad News:

Questionably underpowered.

Standard Equipment:

3.0 liter 210 horsepower V6 engine, 5-speed manual trans, dual front and side air bags, power 4-wheel disc brakes, remote keyless entry, dual auto temp control, air conditioning and filtration system, power / tilt steering wheel, power windows and door locks, 5 passenger leather seating, fog lights, audio system with 6 disc CD changer and 8-way power seat with lumbar support.

Gas Stats:

18 City and 25 Highway MPG.

Pricing:

$33,445

2001 Lincoln Navigator (334)

Overview:
This week we’re looking at the Lincoln Navigator 4X2, much like the Ford Excursion and in direct competition with Cadillac’s Escalade, in my opinion. Both are luxury cars equipped with all the things carmakers do to pamper us. I surely liked it as much as the Escalade and they are priced the same.

I’m not into big, but if you’re in the market for this class luxury vehicle to pull your boat to the river or hunter jumpers to the horse show it’s just what the doctor ordered.

Handling & Performance:

Rides like a well-equipped tank with soft suspension and lots of horsepower. On the other hand, it burns fuel at the same rate. You don’t buy one of these to zip around town. But if you’re on the road to a recreation spot with a good-sized family, this is ticket. I love it but couldn’t bring myself to use up all the resources for just the two of us. Optionally, Navigator can be equipped with an on-demand 4WD with a ground clearance of over eight inches, making it possible to take this luxury vehicle across almost any terrain and through almost any conditions. But I bet you’ll never need to do that. I like the speed sensitive power steering because I like to feel the road at highway speeds.

Styling:

Navigator joins the fast-growing luxury SUV market and is an elegant addition. The optional 17-inch aluminum chrome wheels add a nice sporty touch. Manufacturers finally got rid of the boxy square cornered design of the past decade or so and the softer lines are a welcomed change for most of the folks I’ve talked with.

Fit and Finish:

As expected from Lincoln, the Navigator comes standard with a luxurious interior, including leather upholstery, walnut accents, and dual bucket seats in the second row. An optional second-row split-bench seat increases seating capacity to eight. In addition to all the elegant touches, they are well assembled. American car makers have come a long way in this area, thanks to the mindful Japanese quality leaders for the past generation.

Conveniences:

Ford equips this Lincoln with a number pad under the door handle for keyless entry but I think it is an appendage, especially if you have the ever-handy remote keyless entry key fob.

Cost:

At a base retail price of $47,765 the Navigator 4WD and is pricey. But if you want the extra luxury, it is competitive with similar carmakers.

Recommendation:

Depending on your preference of manufacturer you’ll likely find GM’s Cad Escalade the closest to this Ford product. On balance, I lean toward the Standard of Excellence in Cadillac, but some folks wouldn’t own anything but a Ford product.

The Competition:

AM General Hummer $75,987-94,529, Cadillac Escalade $49,290, Chevrolet Tahoe $24,941-27,857, Ford Expedition $30,140-40,695, GMC Yukon Denali $46,150-47,650, Infiniti QX4 $34,150-35,550, Land Rover Range Rover $62,000-68,000, Lexus LX 470 $61,405, Mercedes M-Class $35,800-65,900, Toyota Land Cruiser $52,895.

Good News:

Speed sensitive power steering, 30-gallon fuel tank, lots of comfortable seating, elegant wood and leather steering wheel, authentic wood trim, nice lighted running boards, great for towing those rec vehicles.

Bad News:

Keypad on doors is a waste of money, terrible gas consumption – you need the 30-gallon fuel tank.

Standard Equipment:

5.4 liter 300 horsepower V8, 4 speed automatic trans, front and side air bags, power 4-wheel disc brakes, anti theft system, remote keyless entry with keypad on door, speed sensitive power steering, climate control, load leveling air suspension, power adjustable pedals, HD trailer tow package, 30 gallon fuel tank, bucket seats first and second row and third row fold-up bench seat, real wood trim, integrated illuminated running boards,

Gas Stats:

12 City and 17 Highway MPG.

Pricing:

12 City and 17 Highway MPG.