Category Archives: Cadillac

2002 Cadillac Escalade EXT (398)

Overview:
This week’s ride was a great selection for a short vacation. Over the river and through the woods to grandmothers house I went in a 2002 Cadillac Escalade EXT AWD (all wheel drive) pickup truck. Boy I never thought I’d be talking about a pickup truck from Cadillac. But few things in life surprise me any longer.\

In any case this is really a Chevrolet Avalanche in a tuxedo. I rather think it is the Darth Vader of auto design, especially in black.

General Info:

Parts –  USA

Assembly – Mexico

Class:  – Special Purpose

Cars: – CTS, DeVille, Eldorado, Escalade, Escalade EXT, Seville.

The Escalade EXT combines a five-passenger sport-utility vehicle with the functionality of a pickup truck that is loaded with comfort, convenience and luxury features.

Handling & Performance:

Steering is a little loose, but I got used to it in a few days. But the ride was so comfortable that I soon forgot any bitching and complaining. I drove 700 miles without stopping except to wring out a kidney and get gas. I have made that drive on several occasions and I have to tell you I was noticeably more rested than when I drove a lesser vehicle. All wheel drive is nice but with that feature and 345 horsepower translates into lousy gas mileage.

Styling:

My sister fell in love with it and said when she gets paid she will buy one and that was before I let her drive it. She flat was in love with the look, and of course, the smooth ride.

Fit and Finish:

Very well done but I did think the steering wheel controls were recessed a little too far.

Conveniences:

Cadillac is always expected to be well equipped and they didn’t disappoint me. On the other hand there is no free lunch and you pay for all the gadgets. Ok, so I have come to like OnStar communications. I was about to run out of gas and I simply pushed the blue button and wa-la Mark comes on the line as polite as you please and guides me to the nearest gas station. And none to soon, I might add. I also have come to like the rear ultrasonic sensing feature and the smart / intelligent cruise control I have had on some products.

I doubt this will ever be used as a pickup truck and even if you pick up your own hay for the horses I don’t think you’d stack a ton of hay on this beauty, as I know I do on a Dodge Ram 3500 dual-ee. Somehow it just doesn’t seem dignified for such an elegant gent. But it’s nice to know you could if you wanted to.

Cost:

Much too much for a slim budget, but for those with a need and lots of green, they can easily justify this kind of pickup truck.

Consumer Recommendation:

If you can justify the cost to buy and operate this Escalade EXT it’s the most high-class versatile full size pickup truck you can buy today. And if you appreciate a luxury ride you won’t be disappointed. Try it; you’ll like it.

The Competition:

Cadillac Escalade EXT, Lincoln Blackwood $51,785, Chevrolet Avalanche $31-36,000.

Good News:

Unique styling and adaptability, super smooth ride.

Bad News:

VERY poor gas performance.

Standard Equipment:

6.0 liter 345 horsepower V8, Converti-Cab with mid-gate panel expanding cargo bed from 5’3” to 8’1”, 4-speed automatic trans, engine, lockable cargo bed with 3-piece rigid cargo bed cover, leather seating, Zebrano wood trim, power seats, heated cushions and backrests, 2nd row split fold down seats, OnStar Communications system with one year service included, Boise music system with cassette and in dash 6-disc CD player, rear seat audio with earphones, climate control, power widows and locks, power folding heating mirrors, 24 hour roadside assistance, all wheel drive with torque split, auto level control, StabiliTrak and road sensing suspension, 4-wheel ABS disc brake system, road sensing suspension, auto level control, traction control, towing package with harness, dual front and side airbags, ultrasonic rear park assist.

Gas Stats:

12 City and 15 Highway MPG.

Pricing:

MSRP $49,245.

2002 Cadillac DeVille DTS (393)

Overview:

This weeks Cadillac DTS (DeVille Touring Sedan) appears to be a “mans” car. Demographics show sales 85% men and 15% women with an average age of 67 and married. Cost can’t be the reason because young people make more money than this age group.

The younger set still seems to opt for BMW, Mercedes and all the “in things” in their generation. The are living with the legacy of parents who abandoned American carmakers in the 60’s and 70’s as a backlash against arrogant and too comfortable US manufacturers. The Japanese gave us an option and we took it. Now the perception is that foreign is better. And thanks to brilliant advertising today’s youthful buyers haven’t rediscovered American cars. It is surely fashionable to own a foreign car, which explains why Cadillac sells so well abroad where it is the import. Mercedes are still used as taxicabs in much of the world. You never see a Porsche on the autobahns of Germany, for example, because all the production they can manage is sold in Los Angeles. The flip side of that is that you do see Corvettes in Europe. Go figure. Is the grass really greener on the other side?

The DTS is new, sporty, high tech and it rivals most of the foreign imports. Consider the following technical features: StabiliTrak 2.0 that controls steering assist to limit wheel travel and keep the vehicle stable. Continuous road sensing independent suspension that reads the road surface and driving style once every millisecond and adjusts from “soft” to “firm”. Magnasteer is continuous speed-sensitive, variable-assist power steering. Rear parking assist radar, Night Vision and OnStar satellite emergency navigation systems round out a full compliment of indications of what’s to come in everyday driving in the future.

I am concerned, however, with future maintenance of such gadgets, albeit from the 8 Cadillac’s I’ve owned, they were all very reliable. It is a Cadillac, after all, and recognized around the world as just that – Top of the line “Standard of Quality”.

Handling & Performance:

Given its wide and tall stance, the DeVille’s steel unibody is remarkably aerodynamic, with a drag coefficient of 0.32. I am old fashioned and prefer the feel of rear wheel drive cars. I suspect I’d appreciate front wheel drive more if I were driving in the snow or other unstable surfaces. Much of the competition are rear wheel drive, like Lexus, BMW, Mercedes, and Infiniti.

Styling:

Don’t ask me, I’ve always loved this car that has only gotten better over the years. Some folks don’t like the front end and some say it is “Bland”, but I rather think it is elegant.

Fit and Finish:

By and large it is every bit as good as any of the competition that cost more than Cad.

Conveniences:

Definitely more than you need. But there’s a lot of neat stuff here. I liked all but the Night Vision. Perhaps the most useful is the “Ultrasonic” rear-sensing device that warns you of objects in your path while backing and parking. But the most important is the OnStar. This can be life saving in many areas. Med-net stores personal and medical information, and if the air bag deploys emergency folks are instantly alerted. In addition you have someone to talk with for help with a host of questions arising during your travels.

Cost:

Luxury is expensive no matter what the brand. However, I’m convinced that in today’s world, your best buy is American. I also believe it will once again regain its prominence in the minds of Americans in the near future. That’s why dollar for dollar; you get the most for your money with American cars.

Consumer Recommendation:

Test-drive this car. Instinctively you know the most advanced technology and engineering and best design people in the world are right here in the USA. Americans are still mesmerized by the aura of European and Japanese made cars. Young buyers will be most apt to buy the DTS model because it is the most sporty and youthful design. In any case, if you agree with me that this is a “class act” don’t waste your money on the Night Vision for $2,250.

I’m really looking forward to testing the CTS model soon. Thoroughly modern in my view, Millie.

Manufacturer Recommendations:

Night vision is a good idea, but it has limited application. In town it is a distraction and I suspect urban areas is where this car will be used. It will be interested to see how it sells. On the other hand, it may just be priced too high.

The Competition:

(1) Cadillac DeVille $43-48,000, (2) Audi A8 $62-67,000, (3) BMW 7 Series $68-72,000, (4) Infiniti Q45 $50,500, (5) Jaguar XJ Series $56-78,000, Lexus LS 430 $54,405, Mercedes Benz S-Class $72-115.000.

Good News:

Many features that will appeal to many, spacious trunk, extremely comfortable on the road, uncharacteristic good gas stats for a big luxury car that weighs 2 tons and you can use 87 octane gas.

Bad News:

Gadgetry could become troublesome and costly to fix.

Standard Equipment:

4.6 liter 300 horsepower V8 NorthStar System, 4-speed auto trans, front wheel drive, Magnasteer power steering, 4-wheel road sensing suspension, StabiliTrak 2.0, 4-wheel antilock disc brakes, traction control, front and side airbags, theft deterrent, keyless entry, power and heated mirrors, OnStar communications, rain sensing wipers and headlight activation, Zebrano wood trim, leather, 10-way power seats, compass, climate control, tilt wheel, Bose sound with cassette and CD, heated seats front and rear, rear air bags, memory, ultrasonic rear parking assist, Night Vision, sunroof, chrome 17” wheels and XM Satellite radio 100 channels national coverage.

Gas Stats:

18 City and 27 Highway MPG.

Pricing:

MSRP $55,395.

2001 Cadillac Catera Sport (324)

Overview:
This week we’re looking at the 2001 Cadillac Catera Sport built in Ruesselsheim, Germany. I believe it was built for Europe and it should stay there. It just isn’t a Cadillac by American standards.

My design engineer friend Merkel commented that for a Cadillac it’s a great Pontiac. Ditto, Merkel. But I guess I felt it was more like the Oldsmobile line.

I simply don’t believe American buyers will accept this knock down, knock off Cad as a substitute. It doesn’t have the usual Cad feel and comfort. We took it on a trip to the central California coast and we found ourselves shifting around in the seats after just a couple of hours. I’ve owned several Cadillac’s and have a little more experience with them than most cars that I have the pleasure of testing. Sorry, GM, I can’t give it a high rating for a Cad and that comes from one who has a love affair with the Cad STS. It is perhaps my most favorite car in the world, for what it is. If I’m feeling my oats, Ferrari will do just fine, thanks.

Aside from not liking it as a Cadillac, it is very nice as a car and if you strip off the badge and thus reduce the price five plus thousand, it would fly.

Handling & Performance:

The car rides well with a solid feel. 0-60 mph is about 8 seconds and I never wanted for passing power. If you don’t like stiff steering, this car will bother you.

Styling:

Typical and commonplace in a cookie cutter fashion, and not up to my view of Cadillac, and I suspect you’ll feel the same. Let me know.

Fit and Finish:

As good as they get for today’s technology.

Conveniences:

Great, but you pay, just as you would in a BMW or Audi, etc.

Cost:

Too much because you’re paying for the name.

Recommendation:

GM is trying to appeal to the young exec and there is a lot of great competition to chose from. Look at the list below and you’ll have a good start. If you like Cadillac as much as I do, see your dealer and you might be able to make a great deal on this made for Europe scaled down version of a quality product.

The Competition:

Acura TL $28,550-30,550, Audi A4 $24,540-30,990, BMW 3-Series $26,990-42,400, Chrysler 300M $29,640, Infiniti I30 $29,465-31,540, Lexus IS 300 $30,805, Lincoln LS $31,665-35,695.

Good News:

Handles well, nice ride, especially responsive at higher road speeds, roomy interior seating and good size trunk.

Bad News:

Cruise controls are different from typical GM and not as easy to use, not up to Cadillac standards, pricey because of the badge and all the features.

Standard Equipment:

3.0 liter V6, 4-speed auto trans, speed sensitive steering, level control, cruise control, dual and side air bags, ABS brakes, keyless entry, daytime and sentinel lights, traction control, power windows and door locks, On-Star system, leather seats, power mirrors, climate control, 8-way power heated front seats with memory on driver seat, lumbar control, Bose sound system with cassette and CD player, leather wrapped steering wheel with audio controls, theft deterrent system, garage door opener, xenon headlights and sunroof.

Gas Stats:

17 City and 24 Highway MPG.

Pricing:

MSRP $36,423

1999 Cadillac Seville STS (265)

Overview:
This 1999 Cadillac Seville STS has always been a favorite for me. For those of you who follow my column, you may recall I’ve owned eight Cad’s in my life and have loved them all. Cadillac remains the symbol of excellence the world over. It cracks me up to hear that Ferrari is the Cadillac of sports cars.

And now Cadillac is reaching out to the world. The 1998 Seville was debuted in Frankfurt Germany and the 2000 will be the official pace car for the 58th running of 24 hours of Le Mans. You may know that is the third endurance race referred to as the Triple Crown. Price Cobb who does Point CounterPoint with me won that race in 1990 for Jaguar.

Cadillac seeks to achieve the goal of capturing the luxury market in Europe and Asia. And for those of you who travel the globe, you know there aren’t too many Cad’s out there. Fact is there aren’t too many American cars of any kind. But the future may find exports growing. Ford and Cad are big in Germany where both have production plants. I visited the Ford plant in Koln, Germany, which is close to the French border, and perhaps someone can tell me where the Cadillac plant is. They build Catera’s there. Cadillac is obviously getting more aggressive by going after Mercedes and BMW with the STS. And if you test drive all three I think you’ll agree that Cad does a great job representing American technology abroad.

The Seville is a 4-door sedan offered in two trims: the luxurious SLS and this sporty STS. The Northstar System powers both. The Seville shares the Oldsmobile Aurora’s G-platform, but the Seville models exported to Europe and Asia are slightly shorter than those sold in North America, where space is not such a rare commodity.

This car comes highly recommended.

The Competition:

Acura RL $41,900, BMW 5-Series $38,900 – $53,900, Infiniti Q45 $48,200 – $49,900, Jaguar S-TYPE $42,500 – $48,000, Lexus GS 300/400 $37,305 – $45,505, Lincoln Continental $38,880, Mercedes-Benz E-Class $42,400 – $69,100, Volvo S80 $36,000 – $40,500.

Good News:

It’s a Cadillac, great ride, elegant styling, Northstar performance, whiplash acceleration, luxury features that are user friendly (in contrast to its German competitors),

Bad News:

I couldn’t find any bad news so I read some other reviews and knew I was right. Anything said would be nit picking.

Standard Equipment:

4.6-liter V8 Northstar engine, 4-speed auto trans, four-wheel anti lock disc brakes, traction control, front and side air bags, rainsense wiper, theft deterrent, climate control, power tilt and tele steering wheel, Zebrano wood and leather trim, power front seats, Bose stereo system, with cassette and CD.

Gas Stats:

17 City and 26 Highway MPG.

Pricing:

MSRP $48,050.

1999 Cadillac Catera (247)

Overview:
The Cadillac Catera remains basically unchanged for 1999, but since I haven’t driven this car since 1996 (1997-model year) I’ve noticed a great improvement in the way it feels.

It’s a Cadillac, built in Germany, and it’s based on the German Opel Omega MV6. Engineers in both the U.S. and Europe developed it. A powerful V6 engine drives the rear wheels and the car displays all the engineering features typical of similar cars designed for Germany’s high-speed Autobahns. I must say I loved the experience of driving on them throughout Europe. It gave me an appreciation for how well a car has to be built to stand up to the demands of prolonged high-speed highway travel. That fact, in itself, is enough to convince me to consider this car over other competition in its class. It truly elevates this Catera, in my view, to a level of greater respect.

Cadillac says Catera is doing the job they wanted it to—over 60 percent of recent Catera buyers traded in a non-GM product, and most buyers listed Lexus as their second-choice vehicle. I don’t know about that, because Lexus makes pretty nice cars. But I do agree the Catera will find itself in good company in any case. The 1999 Cadillac Catera 4-door sedan is available as a single trim. That too sounds more European than American. I like the fact that cars don’t have to change in appearance every couple of years to continue to be desirable. Quite the contrary, we’re creatures of habit and like the comfort of those old shoes, pants, golf clubs etc., and we’re not as trendy as American manufacturers try to make us. Perhaps that explains why American automakers lost market share to foreign carmakers who put more brainpower into changing function over form.

Anyway, when I drove the very first 1997 model in 1996, it was in the state of Colorado and it was snowing. Although it handled well in the weather, I wasn’t overly impressed with the car. I was used to Cadillac being big. The attempt at producing a small version of the Cadillac (Cimeron) didn’t go over well and so I thought why should this be any different. But they’ve convinced me. This is now approaching the Cad standards I’ve come to know and love. Bigger isn’t necessarily better, but generally big goes with the luxury car territory. This really is the Cadillac of small cars. I liked the auto up and down windows that are so great for fast food stops. You can be doing several things at once, like rolling up the windows and still managing to take a bite of that hamburger as you drive off reaching for the seat belt. Well, I figure if women can put on their makeup while driving to work, I can eat an egg McMuffin on my commute.

You’ll be impressed with the performance of the Catera. It is fast, fast, fast and it corners like more expensive cars like the Mercedes E-55 I’m driving now with a price tag sure to choke a horse.

Cad did a wonderful job on the evolution of this Catera. I wonder how much the European market had to do with the quality and enhancements found on the 1999 version.

The Competition:

Acura TL $27,950, Audi A4 $23,790 – $30,040, BMW 3-Series $23,300 – $41,500, Infiniti I30 $28,900 – $31,200, Lexus ES 300 $30,905, Mazda Millenia $26,745 – $31,245, Mercedes-Benz C-Class $31,200 – $53,000, Mitsubishi Diamante $27,199, Volvo S70 $27,385 – $33,520.

Good News:

It’s American “and” it’s built in Germany. It’s the Cadillac of small cars. Great smooth ride and terrific handling.

Bad News:

Lacks styling of upscale luxury small cars.

Standard Equipment:

3.0-liter 200-horsepower V6, coupled to a 4-speed automatic transmission, dual-zone climate control, dust and pollen filter, express power windows and door locks, power front seats, cruise control, remote keyless entry, AM/FM stereo cassette, leather trim, memory function for driver’s 8-way power seat, power/ heated outside mirrors, dual airbags, anti-lock brake system (ABS), traction control, daytime running lights, indicator light that alerts the driver of possible icy road conditions.

Gas Stats:

18 City and 24 Highway MPG.

Pricing:

MSRP $34,180

1999 Cadillac Escalade (235)

Overview:
This week we look at the Cadillac Escalade SUV or is it just a Chey Tahoe in a tux? If it looks like a duck and walks like a duck it probably is a duck. In this case it’s a duck. It’s built on the same platform as the Chevrolet Tahoe and GMC Yukon. It must be intended to provide the ruggedness of a GMC truck with the amenities expected in a Cadillac.

At first blush I got the feeling of “Big” and that meant more like the Chevrolet Suburban. But after a week in this very special SUV I felt the subtle sense that I was indeed in a Cadillac.

I fully expected it to be a so-so car and folks wouldn’t care about it. The fact that Cadillac got into the SUV fray was still a surprise to me and probably you too. I asked myself, why would they get down to “Truck’n” and off road’n. What’s a luxury car doing playing in the mud? Well, I think it really comes down to money. Sales are brisk in this category of car / truck and I suspect that Cadillac thought they had a market. My guess is that they found that upscale product consumers also want to have the image of tough and tumble kind of people while retaining the luxury of Cadillac.

Well, this surely is the Cadillac of SUV’s but it’s not the Jeep of SUV’s if you get my drift. Don’t get me wrong, Jeeps are very comfortable and luxurious too, but there is no other name that speaks class and quality like Cadillac. It has become a common use term to describe anything from soup to nuts as being the best. I’ve said it before, but it bears repeating, that I’ve owned eight Cadillac’s over the years and was always happy with them. The quality is unmistakable. And it’s interesting to note that 75% of SUV’s will never go off road anyway, so Cadillac must have factored that in the decision to produce an upscale Sport Utility.

I liked the partial wood steering wheel because it added that distinction of being a Cadillac and those are the subtle differences buyers would expect in this car. Someone asked, “if it felt so great, then why didn’t they make the whole wheel out of wood?” Good question and I don’t know the answer, but I liked it just the same. In any case I knew I wasn’t driving just any SUV. After all, this is a Cadillac. I knew that, but imagine my surprise when folks actually came up to me and asked about it. When you drive a different car every week, as I do, you notice these kind of attitude changes in people. I experienced smiles, thumbs up, pleasant conversation and sincere interest in the fact that…. “It’s a Cadillac! I didn’t know they made one of these”. They didn’t ma’am until this year and it’s very nice. Then she looked at my shirt and said, “Oh, well you work for Cadillac”. I too then noticed the Icon on my shirt did resemble the Cadillac emblem. “Wait, Ma’am it’s not like that….” Oh well.

I suspect Cadillac’s market research already determined that folks would be interested in the fact that SUV’s could also be classy. And to add even more class to this SUV, Cadillac added OnStar for the rich and famous who would want to be rescued if they went a little too far “Off Road”. If they found themselves in the middle of the jungle with lions and tigers and bears, oh my! Well, they simply push this little blue button and 24 hours a day there is a real live person to talk to who will send whatever help you need. They know exactly where you are via satellite. And there is even a panic button that brings 911 type help even faster if there are bad guys following you. I wonder if that includes cars with flashing red lights? What will they think of next? I guess tough times demand tougher solutions. Speak of being Boy Scout Prepared. And this new version of OnStar is even more simplified as everything is built in. The first year service is free with purchase and then you just get billed monthly after that. And finally, Cadillac Escalade comes in a single trim. What you see is what you get. What else would you expect from a class act?

Would I buy one, you ask? Well, for Beverly Hills bumps it’s ok, but I’m a pretty practical guy. I prefer the 4-wheel independent suspension, 50% more out of the gas tank and a smaller price tag all of which you get from smaller SUV’s. In particular I prefer the Mercedes ML320 or the Lexus RX 300. But let’s face it, American’s like bigger cars for all the gear they carry to go out into the wilderness. You know, generator for the hair dryer, TV and other essentials.

Competition:

GMC Yukon $30,039 – $42,975, Infiniti QX4 $35,550, Jeep Grand Cherokee $25,900 – $34,095,

Land Rover Range Rover $58,000 – $75,000, Lexus LX 470 $55,905, Lincoln Navigator $40,660 – $44,310, Mercedes-Benz M-Class $34,950 – $43,750.

Good News:

It’s new, it’s a Cadillac, it’s great, three cheers for the good guys.

Bad News:

The tow package is for a small gas tanker you’ll need to get across town.

Standard Equipment:

5.7 liter V8 255 hp engine with 4-speed automatic transmission, autotrac 4WD, speed sensitive power steering, chrome aluminum wheels, OnStar system with 1 year service, airbags, remote keyless entry, theft deterrent system, 4-wheel anti lock brakes, air conditioning front and rear, power windows, locks and 10-way front seats, leather and Zebrano wood trim, heated front and rear seats, rear seat audio, cruise control, Bose AM/FM stereo system with cassette, center console-mounted CD changer with six speakers.

Gas Stats:

12 City and 16 Highway MPG.

Pricing:

MSRP $45,875.

1998 Cadillac Seville STS (205)

Overview:
There are a few events more important than a wedding and this Cadillac STS helped to enhance the blessed ceremony of marriage for our family this past month. Son Mike and Lindsey tied the knot and Cadillac embellished the days before, during and after the ceremony and reception.

Finally they went to the airport in the same style to embark on a trip to the Virgin ? Islands. Catalina had to do for me years ago. Do you think folks who live on Capri and Greece come to Catalina for their honeymoons?

It was the Cadillac of weddings, as they all are, and it was fitting because I’ve owned eight Cadillac’s so Mike got a ride in one when he came home from the hospital. It was also a Cadillac that took him back to the hospital for boo-boos that needed attention. These wonderful cars also accompanied us on vacation – from the Grand Canyon, Yosemite, San Francisco and the Mormon Temple in Salt Lake City among many other comfortable trips.

Mike wanted to take the STS to St. Thomas, but they don’t have an amphibeous model. And you know, when I thought of Mike’s wedding the first car that came to mind was Cadillac. Thanks to Chuck H. and the other good folks at Cadillac the day was made even more beautiful.

Cadillac has changed over the years and remains a symbol of excellence the world over. They want to make sure that perception continues around the globe, and thus with the debut of the 1998 Seville in Frankfurt Germany they seek to achieve the goal of capturing the luxury market in Europe and Asia. They will go up against Mercedes, BMW and Lexus with this Seville STS. I drove the E420 Mercedes in Germany last year and wish I could have made the trip in the Seville STS. What you notice in Europe is the “Absence” of American luxury cars. I can’t say I even saw one Cadillac in the six countries I visited in Europe. But then there were precious few Porshe’s in Europe as well. Surprised? I was, but marketing is a curious part of a company’s strategy.

I was impressed with the handling characteristics of the Mercedes-Benz at high speed and I had the chance to contrast that with the Ford Escort that isn’t at home on the autobahn as is the Mercedes, even though they build it there in Koln, Germany. However, I have tested the Cadillac at high speed on a race track and feel it provides similar high speed handling confidence. Cad is tops as far as I’m concerned.

Cadillac has always been a leader in technology and the Northstar System and road sensing suspension are examples. Now they’ve added an adaptive seating option that automatically adjusts the seating to each individual by way of 10 air cells that measure pressure and thus set the seat adjustment for the most comfortable position.

The Competition:

Acura RL $41,200, Audi A6 $33,750 – $35,400, BMW 528 i $38,900, Infiniti Q45 $47,900 – $49,900, Lexus GS 300/400 $36,900 – $44,950, Lincoln Continental $37,930, Mercedes-Benz E420 $45,500.

Good News:

It’s a Cadillac. Better fitting components than ever. Clean lines outside and inside, priced well. Made in the USA.

Bad News:

I could be lured away from the Cad by one of the above. Want to guess?, e-mail me at joe@atthewheel.com or at www.las.net/atthewheel.

Gas Stats:

17 City and 26 Highway MPG.

Pricing:

MSRP is $46,995